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Posts Tagged ‘DevOps’

Bridging the Gap Between Devs & Security – A Collaborative Suggestion…

May 23rd, 2012 3 comments

After my keynote at Gluecon (Shit My Cloud Evangelist Says…Just Not To My CSO,) I was asked by an attendee what things he could do within his organization to repair the damage and/or mistrust between developers and security organizations in enterprises.

Here’s what I suggested based on past experience:

  1. Reach out and have a bunch of “brown bag lunches” wherein you host-swap each week; devs and security folks present to one another with relevant, interesting or new solutions in their respective areas
  2. Pick a project that takes a yet-to-be-solved interesting business challenge that isn’t necessarily on the high priority project list and bring the dev and security teams together as if it were an actual engagement.

Option 1 starts the flow of information.¬† Option 2 treats the project as if it were high priority but allows security and dev to work together to talk about platform choices, management, security, etc. and because it’s not mission critical, mistakes can be made and learned from…together.

For example, pick something like building a new app service that uses node.js and MongoDB and figure out how to build, deploy and secure it…as if you were going to deploy to public cloud from day one (and maybe you will.)

You’ll be amazed to see the trust it builds, especially in light of developers enrolling security in their problem and letting them participate from the start versus being the speed bump later.

10 minutes later it’ll be a DevOps love-fest. ūüėČ

/Hoff

 

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Incomplete Thought: The DevOps Disconnect

May 31st, 2010 17 comments

DevOps — what it means and how it applies — is a fascinating topic that inspires all sorts of interesting reactions from people, polarized by their interpretation of what this term really means.

At CloudCamp Denver, adjacent to Gluecon, Aaron Peterson of¬†OpsCode gave a lightning talk titled:¬†“Operations as Code.” ¬†I’ve seen this presentation on-line before, but listened intently as Aaron presented. ¬†You can see John Willis’ version on Slideshare here. ¬†Adrian Cole (@adrianfcole) of jClouds fame (and now Opscode)¬†and I had an awesome hour-long discussion afterwards that was the genesis for this post.

“Operations as Code” (I’ve seen it described also as “Infrastructure as Code”) is really a fantastically sexy and intriguing phrase. ¬†When boiled down, what I extract is that the DevOps “movement” is less about developers becoming operators, but rather the notion that developers can be part of the process whereby they help enable operations/operators to repeatably and with discipline, automate processes that are otherwise manual and prone to error.

[Ed: great feedback from Andrew Shafer: “DevOps isn’t so much about developers helping operations, it’s about operational concerns becoming more and more programmable, and operators becoming more and more comfortable and capable with that. ¬†Further, John Allspaw (@allspaw) added some great commentary below – talking about DevOps really being about tools + culture + communication. Adam Jacobs from Opscode *really* banged out a great set of observations in the comments also. All good perspective.]

Automate, automate, automate.

While I find the message of DevOps totally agreeable, it’s the messaging that causes me concern, not because of the groups it includes, but those that it leaves out. ¬†I find that the most provocative elements of the DevOps “manifesto” (sorry) are almost religious in nature. ¬†That’s to be expected as most great ideas are.

In many presentations promoting DevOps, developers are shown to have evolved in practice and methodology, but operators (of all kinds) are described as being stuck in the dark ages. DevOps evangelists paint a picture that compares and contrasts the Agile-based, reusable componentized, source-controlled,¬†team-based and integrated approach of “evolved” development environments with that of loosely-scripted, poorly-automated,¬†inefficient, individually-contributed, undisciplined, non-source-controlled operations.

You can see how this might be just a tad off-putting to some people.

In Aaron’s presentation, the most interesting concept to me is the definition of “infrastructure.” Take the example to the right, wherein various “infrastructure” roles are described. ¬†What should be evident is that to many — especially those in enterprise (virtualized or otherwise) or non-Cloud environments — is that these software-only components represent only a fraction of what makes up “infrastructure.”

The loadbalancer role, as an example makes total sense if you’re using HAproxy or Zeus ZXTM. What happens if it’s an F5 or Cisco appliance?

What about the routers, switches, firewalls, IDS/IPS, WAFs, SSL engines, storage, XML parsers, etc. that make up the underpinning of the typical datacenter? ¬†The majority of these elements — as most of them exist today — do not present consistent interfaces for automation/integration. Most of them utilize proprietary/closed API’s for management that makes automation cumbersome if not impossible across a large environment.

Many will react to that statement by suggesting that this is why Cloud Computing is the great equalizer — that by abstracting the “complexity” of these components into a more “simplified” set of software resources versus hardware, it solves this problem and without the hardware-centric focus of infrastructure and the operations mess that revolves around it today, we’re free to focus on “building the business versus running the business.”

I’d agree. ¬†The problem is that these are two different worlds. ¬†The mass-market IaaS/PaaS providers who provide abstracted representations of infrastructure are still the corner-cases when compared to the majority of service providers who are entering the Cloud space specifically focused on serving the enterprise, and the enterprise — even those that are heavily virtualized — still very dependent upon hardware.

This is where the DevOps messaging miss comes — at least as it’s described today. DevOps is really targeted (today) toward the software-homogeneity of public, mass-market Cloud environments (such as Amazon Web Services) where infrastructure can be defined as abstract component, software-only roles, not the complex mish-mash of hardware-focused IT of the enterprise as it currently stands. This may be plainly obvious to some, but the messaging of DevOps is obscuring the message which is unfortunate.

DevOps is promoted today as a target operational end-state without explicitly defining that the requirements for success really do depend upon the level of abstraction in the environment; it’s really focused on public Cloud Computing. ¬†In and of itself, that’s not a bad thing at all, but it’s a “marketing” miss when it comes to engaging with a huge audience who wants and needs to get the DevOps religion.

You can preach to the choir all day long, but that’s not going to move the needle.

My biggest gripe with the DevOps messaging is with the name itself. If you expect to truly automate “infrastructure as code,” we really should call it NetSecDevOps. Leaving the network and security teams — and the infrastructure they represent — out of the loop until they are either subsumed by software (won’t happen) or get religion (probable but a long-haul exercise) is counter-productive.

Take security, for example. By design, 95% of security technology/solutions are — by design — not easily automatable or are built to require human interaction given their mission and lack of intelligence/correlation with other tools. ¬†How do you automate around that? ¬†It’s really here that the statement I’ve made that “security doesn’t scale” is apropos. Believe me, I’m not making excuses for the security industry, nor am I suggesting this is how it ought to be, but it is how it currently exists.

Of course we’re seeing the next generation of datacenters in the enterprise become more abstract. With virtualization and cloud-like capabilities being delivered with automated provisioning, orchestration and governance by design for BOTH hardware and software and the vision of private/public cloud integration baked into enterprise architecture, we’re actually on a path where DevOps — at its core — makes total sense.

I only wish that (NetSec)DevOps evangelists — and companies such as Opscode — would ¬†address this divide up-front and start to reach out to the enterprise world to help make DevOps a goal that these teams aspire to rather than something to rub their noses in. ¬†Further, we need a way for the community to contribute things like Chef recipes that allow for flow-through role definition support for hardware-based solutions that do have exposed management interfaces (Ed: Adrian referred to these in a tweet as ‘device’ recipes)

/Hoff

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