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Posts Tagged ‘National Institute of Standards and Technology’

NIST’s Trusted Geolocation in the Cloud: PoC Implementation

December 22nd, 2012 3 comments

I was very interested and excited to learn what NIST researchers and staff had come up with when I saw the notification of the “Draft Interagency Report 7904, Trusted Geolocation in the Cloud: Proof of Concept Implementation.”

It turns out that this report is an iteration on the PoC previously created by VMware, Intel and RSA back in 2010 which utilized Intel’s TXT, VMWare’s virtualization platform and the RSA/Archer GRC platform, as this one does.

I haven’t spent much time to look at the differences, but I’m hoping as I read through it that we’ve made progress…

You can read about the original PoC here, and watch a video from 2010 about it here.  Then you can read about it again in its current iteration, here (PDF.)

I wrote about this topic back in 2009 and still don’t have a good firm answer to the question I asked in 2009 in a blog titled “Quick Question: Any Public Cloud Providers Using Intel TXT?” and the follow-on “More On High Assurance (via TPM) Cloud Environments

At CloudConnect 2011 I also filmed a session with the Intel/RSA/VMware folks titled “More On Cloud and Hardware Root Of Trust: Trusting Cloud Services with Intel® TXT

I think this is really interesting stuff and a valuable security and compliance capability, but is apparently still hampered with practical deployment challenges.

I’m also confused as to why RSA employees were not appropriately attributed under the NIST banner and this is very much a product-specific/vendor-specific set of solutions…I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a NIST-branded report like this.

At any rate, I am interested to see if we will get to the point where these solutions will have more heterogeneous uptake across platforms.

/Hoff

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When A FAIL Is A WIN – How NIST Got Dissed As The Point Is Missed

January 2nd, 2012 4 comments

Randy Bias (@randybias) wrote a very interesting blog titled Cloud Computing Came To a Head In 2011, sharing his year-end perspective on the emergence of Cloud Computing and most interestingly the “…gap between ‘enterprise clouds’ and ‘web-scale clouds’”

Given that I very much agree with the dichotomy between “web-scale” and “enterprise” clouds and the very different sets of respective requirements and motivations, Randy’s post left me confused when he basically skewered the early works of NIST and their Definition of Cloud Computing:

This is why I think the NIST definition of cloud computing is such a huge FAIL. It’s focus is on the superficial aspects of ‘clouds’ without looking at the true underlying patterns of how large Internet businesses had to rethink the IT stack.  They essentially fall into the error of staying at my ‘Phase 2: VMs and VDCs’ (above).  No mention of CAP theorem, understanding the fallacies of distributed computing that lead to successful scale out architectures and strategies, the core socio-economics that are crucial to meeting certain capital and operational cost points, or really any acknowledgement of this very clear divide between clouds built using existing ‘enterprise computing’ techniques and those using emergent ‘cloud computing’ technologies and thinking.

Nope. No mention of CAP theorem or socio-economic drivers, yet strangely the context of what the document was designed to convey renders this rant moot.

Frankly, NIST’s early work did more to further the discussion of *WHAT* Cloud Computing meant than almost any person or group evangelizing Cloud Computing…especially to a world of users whose most difficult challenges is trying to understand the differences between traditional enterprise IT and Cloud Computing

As I reacted to this point on Twitter, Simon Wardley (@swardley) commented in agreement with Randy’s assertions, but strangely what I found odd again was the misplaced angst by which the criterion of “success” vs “FAIL” that both Simon and Randy were measuring the NIST document against:

Both Randy and Simon seem to be judging NIST’s efforts against their lack of extolling the virtues, or “WHY” versus the “WHAT” of Cloud, and as such, were basically doing a disservice by perpetuating aged concepts rooted in archaic enterprise practices rather than boundary stretch, trailblaze and promote the enlightened stance of “web-scale” cloud.

Well…

The thing is, as NIST stated in both the purpose and audience sections of their document, the “WHY” of Cloud was not the main intent (and frankly best left to those who make a living talking about it…)

From the NIST document preface:

1.2 Purpose and Scope

Cloud computing is an evolving paradigm. The NIST definition characterizes important aspects of cloud computing and is intended to serve as a means for broad comparisons of cloud services and deployment strategies, and to provide a baseline for discussion from what is cloud computing to how to best use cloud computing. The service and deployment models defined form a simple taxonomy that is not intended to prescribe or constrain any particular method of deployment, service delivery, or business operation.

1.3 Audience

The intended audience of this document is system planners, program managers, technologists, and others adopting cloud computing as consumers or providers of cloud services.

This was an early work (the initial draft was released in 2009, final in late 2011,) and when it was written, many people — Randy, Simon and myself included — we still finding the best route, words and methodology to verbalize the “Why.” And now it’s skewered as “mechanistic drivel.”*

At the time NIST was developing their document, I was working in parallel writing the “Architecture” chapter of the first edition of the Cloud Security Alliance’s Guidance for Cloud Computing.  I started out including my own definitional work in the document but later aligned to the NIST definitions because it was generally in line with mine and was well on the way to engendering a good deal of conversation around standard vocabulary.

This blog post summarized the work at the time (prior to the NIST inclusion).  I think you might find the author of the second comment on that post rather interesting, especially given how much of a FAIL this was all supposed to be… :)

It’s only now with the clarity of hindsight that it’s easier to take the “WHY,” and utilize the “WHAT” (from NIST and others, especially practitioners like Randy) in a manner that is complementary so we can talk less about “what and why” and rather “HOW.”

So while the NIST document wasn’t, isn’t and likely never will be “perfect,” and does not address every use case or even eloquently frame the “WHY,” it still serves as a very useful resource upon which many people can start a conversation regarding Cloud Computing.

It’s funny really…the first tenet for “web-scale” cloud that AWS — the “Kings of Cloud” Randy speaks about constantly —  is “PLAN FOR FAIL.”  So if the NIST document truly meets this seal of disapproval and is a FAIL, then I guess it’s a win ;p

Your opinion?

/Hoff

*N.B. I’m not suggesting that critiquing a document is somehow verboten or that NIST is somehow infallible or sacrosanct — far from it.  In fact, I’ve been quite critical and vocal in my feedback with regard to both this document and efforts like FedRAMP.  However, this is during the documents’ construction and with the intent to make it better within the context within which they were designed versus the rear view mirror.

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FYI: New NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture

March 31st, 2011 No comments
logo of National Institute of Standards and Te...

Image via Wikipedia

In case you weren’t aware, NIST has a WIKI for collaboration on Cloud Computing.  You can find it here.

They also have a draft of their v1.0 Cloud Computing Reference Architecture, which builds upon the prior definitional work we’ve seen before and has pretty graphics.  You can find that, here (dated 3/30/2011)

/Hoff

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