Home > Cloud Computing, Cloud Security > Is What We Need…An OpSec K/T Boundary Extinction-Level Event?

Is What We Need…An OpSec K/T Boundary Extinction-Level Event?

Tens of millions of Aons (a new quantification of time based on Amazon Web Services AMI spin-ups) from now, archeologists and technosophers will look back on the inevitable emergence of Cloud in the decade following the double-oughts and muse about the mysterious disappearance of the security operations species…

Or not.

The “Cloud Security, Meh!” crowd are an interesting bunch. They don’t seem to like change much.  To be fair, they’re not incentivized to.  However, while difficult, change is good…it just takes a lot to understand that some times.

It occurs to me that if we expect behavior to change in the way in which we approach “security,” it must start with a reset of expectations surrounding how we evaluate outcomes, how we’re measured, and most importantly the actual security leadership itself must change.

Most seasoned CxOs these days that have been in the business for 15+ years are in their late 30’s/early 40’s.  Most of “us” — from official scientifical research I have curated [at the bar] — came from System Administrator/Network Administrator roles back in the 80’s/90’s.

Now, what’s intriguing is that back then, “security” was just one functional component and responsibility of many duties slapped on the back of overworked and underfunded “router jockeys” or “unix neckbearders.”  Back in the day we did it all — we managed the network, massaged the Solaris/NT boxes, helped deploy and manage the apps and were responsible for “securing” it all as we connected stuff to the Internet.

You know, like, um, DevOps.

So today in larger organizations (notsomuch in smaller orgs/startups,) we have a raging rejection of this generalized approach to service delivery/IT by the VERY SAME individuals who arose phoenix-like from the crater left when the Internet exploded and the rampant adoption of technology and siloed operational models became “best practice.” Compliance didn’t help.  Then they got promoted.

In many cases then, the bristled reaction by security folks to things like virtualization, Cloud, Agile, DevOps, etc. is highly generational.  The up-and-coming rank-in-file digital natives who are starting to break into the industry will know these things as “normal,” much like a preschooler uses gestures on an iPad…it just…is.

However, their leadership — “us” — the 40+ year olds that are large and in charge are busy barking that youngsters should get off our IT lawn.  This is very much a generational issue.

So I think what that means is that ultimately we’re waiting for our own version of the K/T boundary extinction-level “opportunity,”  the horizon event at the boundary of the Cretacious/Tertiary periods 65 million years ago where almost all of the Earth’s large vertebrates — all dinosaurs, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, and pterosaurs — suddenly became extinct.  Boom.  Gone.  Damned meteorites.

Now, unless the next great piece of malware can target, infect and destroy humans as we Bing/Google/click our way into stupidity (coming next week from Iran?) ala Stuxnet/Flame, we’re not going to see these stodgy C(I)SOs vanish instantly, but over the next two decades, we’ll see a new generation arise who think, act and believe differently than we do today…I just hope it doesn’t take that long.

This change…it’s natural. It’s evolution, and patterns like these repeat (see the theory of punctuated equilibrium) even in the face of revolution.  It’s messy.

More often than not, it’s not the technology that’s the problem with “security” when we hit one of these inflection points in computing. No, it’s the organizational, operational, cultural, fiscal, and (dare I say) religious issues that hold us back.  Innovation breeds more innovation unless it’s shackled by people who can’t think outside of the box.

That right there is what defines a dino/plesio/mosa/ptero-saur.

Come to think of it, maybe we do need an OpSec extinction-level event to move us forward instead of waiting 20 years for the AARP forced slide to Florida.

Or, in the words of Gunny Highway from Heartbreak Ridge, we must “Improvise, adapt and overcome.”

If that’s not a DevOps Darwinian double-entendre, I don’t know what is ;)

Don’t be a dinosaur.

/Hoff

 

 

  1. May 6th, 2013 at 19:58 | #1

    I agree with the words of Gunny Highway from Heartbreak Ridge, we must “Improvise, adapt and overcome.” If we do not do this, then a lot of technology and other facts of the world that is ever changing are going to stay the same. This is well thought out article that I enjoyed since we share the same view points. I do have to say however, that even if the older generations do not want the ‘youngsters’ on their yards, they have to think outside of the box as well. Since technology is evolving, the old timers may not be as equipped to use newer software and programs since they may be used to the ‘old way’ of doing things. Do you agree?

  1. June 26th, 2012 at 03:34 | #1