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Joanna Rutkowska: Making Invisible Things Visible…

I’ve had my issues in the past with Joanna Rutkowska; the majority of which have had nothing to do with technical content of her work, but more along the lines of how it was marketed.  That was then, this is now.

Recently, the Invisible Things Lab team have released some really interesting work regarding attacking the SMM.  What I’m really happy about is that Joanna and her team are really making an effort to communicate the relevance and impact  the team’s research and exploits really have in ways they weren’t doing before.  As much as I was critical previously, I must acknowledge and thank her for that, too.

I’m reasonably sure that Joanna could care less what I think, but I think the latest work is great and really does indicate the profoundly shaky foundation upon which we’ve built our infrastructure and I am thankful for what this body of work points out. 

Here’s a copy of Joanna’s latest blog titled “The Sky is Falling?” explaining such:

A few reporters asked me if our recent paper on SMM attacking via CPU cache poisoning means the sky is really falling now?

Interestingly, not many people seem to have noticed that this is the 3rd attack against SMM our team has found in the last 10 months. OMG :o

But anyway, does the fact we can easily compromise the SMM today, and write SMM-based malware, does that mean the sky is falling for the average computer user?

No! The sky has actually fallen many years ago… Default users with admin privileges, monolithic kernels everywhere, most software unsigned and downloadable over plaintext HTTP — these are the main reasons we cannot trust our systems today. And those pathetic attempts to fix it, e.g. via restricting admin users on Vista, but still requiring full admin rights to install any piece of stupid software. Or selling people illusion of security via A/V programs, that cannot even protect themselves properly…

It’s also funny how so many people focus on solving the security problems by “Security by Correctness” or “Security by Obscurity” approaches — patches, patches, NX and ASLR — all good, but it is not gonna work as an ultimate protection (if it could, it would worked out already).

On the other hand, there are some emerging technologies out there that could allow us to implement effective“Security by Isolation” approach. Such technologies as VT-x/AMD-V, VT-d/IOMMU or Intel TXT and TPM.

So we, at ITL, focus on analyzing those new technologies, even though almost nobody uses them today. Because those technologies could actually make the difference. Unlike A/V programs or Patch Tuesdays, those technologies can change the level of sophistication required for the attacker dramatically.

The attacks we focus on are important for those new technologies — e.g. today Intel TXT is pretty much useless without protection from SMM attacks. And currently there is no such protection, which sucks. SMM rootkits sound sexy, but, frankly, the bad guys are doing just fine using traditional kernel mode malware (due to the fact that A/V is not effective). Of course, SMM rootkits are just yet another annoyance for the traditional A/V programs, which is good, but they might not be the most important consequence of SMM attacks.

So, should the average Joe Dow care about our SMM attacks? Absolutely not!

I really appreciate the way this is being discussed; I think the ITL work is (now) moving the discussion forward by framing the issues instead of merely focusing on sensationalist exploits that whip people into a frenzy and cause them to worry about things they can’t control instead of the things they unfortunately choose not to ;) 

I very much believe that we can and will see advancements with the “security by isolation” approach; a lot of other bad habits and classes of problems can be eliminated (or at least significantly reduced) with the benefit of virtualization technology. 

/Hoff